1. The Learning Institute Conference

The Learning Institute will feature two single topic sessions:

The Neuroscience of Learning 4.00pm – 6.00pm

The Neuroscience of Learning is designed to provide participants with an in-depth understanding of the neuroscience involved in the learning process. Participants will learn effective, brain-based classroom strategies to motivate student learning.

Teaching Math 6.30pm – 8.00pm

Teaching Math: Why Students Struggle and What You Can Do to Help takes a close look at the key cognitive and neurological factors that cause students to struggle with mathematical content, including our emerging understanding of dyscalculia. The workshop presents evidence-based, hands-on instruction in practices that can help all students learn math. The strategies, tools, and resources shared at these two sessions will benefit all learners.

When: Friday, March 28, 2014

Location:
York Catholic District School Board Office
320 Bloomington Road West, Aurora, Ontario

For more information, please visit:
http://ldayr.org/wsite/wp-content/new-uploads/2014/01/landmark-conference4.pdf

2. The Impact of Working Memory Deficits: “In and Out of School”

Working Memory Workshop for Parents

Working memory is your brain’s Post-it note. It makes all the difference to successful learning. Several research studies show a correlation between high working memory and a kid’s success in school.

Working memory is the ability to hold information in your head and manipulate it mentally. Students in school need this memory on a daily basis for a variety of tasks such as following teachers’ instructions or remembering sentences they have been asked to write down. Outside of school, working memory also has its impact.

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 / 6.30pm – 8.30pm

Location:
Loyal True Blue and Orange Home
11181 Yonge Street, Richmond Hill, ON, L4S 1L2

For more information, please visit:
http://ldayr.org/wsite/wp-content/new-uploads/2014/01/workingmemory_parents.pdf

3. What is it and Why is it so Important for School?

Working Memory Workshop for Teachers

New research suggests that working memory may be key in predicting which students do well in school. In fact, kids with the best working memories, rather than those with the highest IQs, seem to become the future high-achievers. Researchers have concluded that IQ and working memory are two separate skills and that, of the two, working memory is the better predictor of learning outcomes and school success.

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014 / 4.00pm – 6.00pm

Location:
Loyal True Blue and Orange Home
11181 Yonge Street, Richmond Hill, ON, L4S 1L2

For more information, please visit:
http://ldayr.org/wsite/wp-content/new-uploads/2014/01/workingmemory_teachers.pdf